Mycoplasma In Cats
Mycoplasma In Cats

Mycoplasma In Cats

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Mycoplasma In Cats
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Mycoplasma In Cats – Mycoplasma is a bacterial organism that is capable of infecting humans, animals, insects and plants. It can affect a number of organs and consequently, create a broad selection of associated disorders.

Any one of several serotypes (subtypes) of Mycoplasma can lead to illness. This infection is observed in both dogs and cats. Mycoplasma is sometimes found in healthy dogs without causing illness. There’s absolutely no sex, age or breed predilection.

Anxiety, concurrent disease, immunodeficiency/immunosuppression (poorly functioning or underactive immune system) and cancer may render a person more susceptible to disease from Mycoplasma.

The effect on the pet can differ from a complete lack of signs to severe illness.

Things to Watch For

  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Sniffling
  • Straining to urinate
  • Blood in urine
  • Frequent urination
  • Abortion
  • Infertility
  • Arthritis
  • Colitis (bloody/mucoid nausea)
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Lethargy
  • Depression
  • Weakness
  • Anorexia
  • Weight Reduction
  • Skin abscesses

Identification of Mycoplasma in Cats

  • Complete blood count (CBC)
  • Biochemical profile
  • Urinalysis
  • Screening chest and gut X-rays
  • Culture and isolation of this organism
  • Serologic testing, or blood tests that measure antibodies or the bodies reaction to an organism

Treatment of Mycoplasma in Cats

  • Based on the severity of clinical signs, treatment options may include out-patient care or may necessitate hospitalization.
  • Supportive care, to add fluid and electrolyte therapy may be indicated.
  • Antibiotic treatment is indicated.Administer all medication and reunite for followup as directed by your vet. Prognosis is usually good in otherwise healthy animals.There’s currently no vaccine available to reduce Mycoplasma infection. The organism is easily killed by drying, chemical and sunlight disinfection.

     

    In-depth Details on Mycoplasma in CatsIt’s not uncommon for pets to have no symptoms; Mycoplasma was isolated from healthy dogs. Several risk factors may render a person more prone to Mycoplasma, including general health status and environment, concurrent disease or management of certain medications, like corticosteroids and chemotherapy, that cause suppression of the immune system. Many systems can be impacted by Mycoplasma, and subsequently, many different clinical scenarios. Since the signs are so changeable, many ailments must initially be considered.

    A host of infectious agents that cause respiratory signals will need to be distinguished from Mycoplasma. These include:

  • Other bacteria (Bordatella bronchiseptica, coliforms, Staphylococci, Streptococci)
  • Viral (parainfluenza virus, canine distemper)
  • Fungal (Histoplasma, Pythium, Aspergillus)Diseases which cause abortion, infertility, stillbirths or weak newborns will need to be distinguished from Mycoplasma. These include:
  • Compounds (Brucella, Salmonella, Campylobacter, E. coli, Streptococcus)
  • Viruses (canine herpesvirus, canine distemper, canine adenovirus)
  • Toxoplasma gondii
  • Endocrine disorders (hypothyroidism)
  • Drug/medication management: chemotherapy, hormones, certain antibiotics
  • Severe stress/traumaDiseases that cause arthritis has to be ruled out. These include:
  • Viruses
  • Compounds
  • Diagnosis In-depthCertain tests have to be done to get a definitive diagnosis of Mycoplasma infections and also to exclude other disease processes that can cause similar symptoms. A comprehensive history, description of clinical signs and thorough physical examination are all an important part of getting a diagnosis. Moreover, these tests are recommended to confirm a diagnosis:

  • A complete blood count (CBC) may be within normal limits, but it may show mild anemia (low red blood cell count), or elevated white blood cell count.
  • A biochemical profile can help assess the kidney, liver, protein and electrolyte status. Although often within normal limits, it’s helpful to rule out other disorders that may mimic Mycoplasma.
  • A urinalysis will help to assess the kidneys and degree of hydration.
  • Chest and abdominal X-rays are recommended generally. Although often within normal limits, they may help to rule out other diseases or affirm changes that are relevant to Mycoplasma infection, such as pneumonia.
  • Serologic testing may assist in diagnosing Mycoplasma. It necessitates a blood test, which shows a value measuring the potency of a reaction between specific substances in the body. High values may be indicative of Mycoplasma infection. Special care has to be taken in sampling, handling and transport, as Mycoplasma is a delicate organism and can be tricky to isolate.Your vet may need additional tests to insure optimal medical care. These are chosen on a case by case basis:
  • Arthrocentesis is recommended in situations where joint involvement exists. It’s a simple procedure that’s done by introducing a needle into the joint cavity to recover fluid for culture and analysis. This procedure can usually be carried out by the local veterinarian. It’s a simple procedure that enables us to evaluate cells and sometimes causative agents involved with pneumonia. This procedure can usually be carried out by the local veterinarian.
  • Therapy In-depthAppropriate therapy for Mycoplasma infections varies based on the type and severity of clinical illness. Based upon the severity of clinical signs and/or period of disease, hospitalization may or might not be recommended. Stable patients may be treated as outpatients provided that they’re monitored closely for response to treatment. With appropriate treatment, most patients do very well. It’s quite important that all recommendations from your vet are followed very carefully, and any queries or concerns that arise during the treatment protocol are addressed promptly.

  • Antibiotic therapy is most important in these patients. It’s important to treat for a protracted time period to remove disease completely.

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